英文解読練習として英語のニュースから日本語に翻訳された記事をよく読んでいますか?このコーナーではそんな世界の面白いニュースとその日本語訳をピックアップしてご紹介します。リーディングや外国人に話しかける時にも、緊張をほぐして、会話のきっかけとしていかがですか?

英語:“Trolls Told Me I’m Too Ugly To Post Pics. Then I Did And Something Incredible Happened.”

“Melissa Blake should be banned from posting pictures of herself.”
Those were the words that greeted me one afternoon as I was scrolling the internet. It was just 10 words, left by a stranger in the comments of a YouTube video I was mentioned in, but they packed a powerful punch. I winced, but not as much as you might think.

Did those words hurt? Absolutely. Was I surprised by them? Not in the slightest. Sadly, I’ve come to expect them.
Let me back up a little first, though.
I’m a freelance writer and blogger, and I write extensively about my life with a physical disability, as well as women’s issues. I’ve always been open and candid about what it’s like to live for 38 years in a body that makes some people very uncomfortable, and over the years, my writing has made people equally uncomfortable. But living in my world ― a world that wasn’t made for people like me, even though 1 in 4 people in the United States live with a disability ― has shown me that we still don’t talk about disabilities enough. And when we do, our conversations are all too often filled with stereotypes and misconceptions. I’m sure you know what I’m talking about ― that old, antiquated idea that disabled people live out their days at home, closed off from the rest of the world, maybe a blanket draped over their lap.
It’s a disgusting tableau, isn’t it?
But like I said, it’s nothing I haven’t heard before.

After I wrote a CNN op-ed last month suggesting that we should all unfollow Trump on Twitter, a conservative YouTuber mentioned me in one of his videos. The comments on his video were filled with people attacking my appearance. There was no thoughtful critique of what I wrote. No mention of the actual content of my op-ed. No, no, no. People just went straight for jabs and insults about how I look.
I was inspired, to say the least. So inspired, in fact, that I posted this tweet as a defiant, cheeky response, in which I wrote: “During the last round of trollgate, people said that I should be banned from posting photos of myself because I’m too ugly. So I’d just like to commemorate the occasion with these 3 selfies…”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, my disability does make me look different. Trust me, I know that. I’ve known that my entire life. I was born with Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, a genetic bone and muscular disorder, and have spent years coming to terms with my disability.
Growing up, the mirror often felt like my biggest enemy. I’d see myself, see my wheelchair, see my deformed hands and think, Maybe I am just ugly. Most of my scars were hidden under my clothes, but that didn’t matter because I could still feel them ― I could feel every one of them (and trust me, after 26 surgeries, I have a lot of scars) and I sometimes felt like the world could sense those scars too. I was so certain people would be repulsed by them in the same way I was for most of my teenage years.
It doesn’t help that we live in a society with very strict definitions of beauty ― what it looks like, who qualifies and, of course, who doesn’t. Everything from commercials to Instagram feeds gives us this aspirational, unattainable ideal.
Pretty is good. Pretty is acceptable. Pretty is perfect.

And anything that deviates, even slightly? Well, it’s bad and unacceptable. Disabilities are included in that message, and we see it play out far too often. Take something as harmless as the Disney movies we all grew up watching. We’re presented with a beautiful princess, like Ariel in “The Little Mermaid,” and an ugly villain, like Ursula. And in the case of “The Lion King,” it doesn’t get much more literal than a villain named Scar.
Indeed, we’re taught that being disfigured is synonymous with ugly. I saw it play out in real time in those YouTube comments ― thousands of comments about how I was ugly and disgusting. Some people wonder why I’ve struggled so much with self-acceptance when it comes to how I look and our society’s notion of what “beautiful” is. It’s because of comments like these — comments that dismiss me and deem me unworthy because of my disability.

It’s been a little over two weeks since I tweeted those three photos, and that single tweet has gone viral ― receiving nearly 300,000 likes and 30,000 retweets! I’ve been getting a lot of press and have been interviewed by Good Morning America, People, the BBC, MSN, CBS 2 Chicago and the Chicago Tribune. The post has also been shared by celebrities such as George Takei, Jameela Jamil and Blink-182′s Mark Hoppus.

“That tweet … brought disabilities and beauty together ― two things we don’t typically associate with each other. That tweet showed the world that those two things can exist together and that disabilities can be beautiful.

In that one tweet, I owned my beauty. For the first time in my life, I felt worthy and deserving. In less than 280 characters, I found the sense of self-confidence I’d been looking for since those days spent analyzing myself in front of the mirror.
I’m not a beauty queen. I know that. I’ll never win pageants or be on the cover of a fashion magazine, but that doesn’t mean I’m ugly.
In fact, I’m realizing more and more how my viral tweet wasn’t just about clapping back at internet trolls, though I admit that did feel good. That tweet also brought disabilities and beauty together ― two things we don’t typically associate with each other. That tweet showed the world that those two things can exist together and that disabilities can be beautiful.
Needless to say, the last two weeks have been a surreal whirlwind in the best way possible. I had no idea my one simple tweet would end up going viral, but I’m so glad it did because I really feel like we’ve started a much-needed conversation. And I’m here to tell you: Yes, I’m disabled. And, yes, it’s OK for people with disabilities to celebrate their beauty.
I’m sure there will still be people who think I’m too ugly to post selfies. I mean, how could people with disabilities be comfortable in their own bodies, much less celebrate themselves and actually feel beautiful?
Who does that?
I do, that’s who. I’m going to keep doing it, too (see the #MyBestSelfie hashtag that I started). Consider it my defiant, cheeky message to the world. My body will never be perfect, but it’s real. And to me, real is beautiful.

Melissa Blake is a freelance writer and blogger from Illinois. She covers relationships, disabilities and pop culture and has written for CNN, The Washington Post, Good Housekeeping, Cosmo and Glamour, among others. Follow her on Twitter at @MelissaBlake and read her blog at MelissaBlakeBlog.com.

Copyright 2019 Verizon Media.
原文を読む≫

===========================================================

日本語:“「醜すぎるから写真をSNSに投稿するな」と言われた。だから私は自撮り写真を投稿した”

これは私の反抗で、世界への生意気なメッセージです

「メリッサ・ブレークは、自分の写真を投稿するのを禁止すべきだ」

ある日の午後、私はネット上でこのコメントを見つけました。YouTubeのコメント欄に残された言葉です。
とても短い言葉だけれど、私に強力なパンチをくらわせました。思わず顔をしかめました。

だけど私は、みなさんが思っているほど苦々しい顔をしていなかったかもしれません。この言葉は私を傷つけたかって?もちろん傷つけました。コメントに驚いた?いいえ、ちっとも。残念だけれど、こんなことを言われるだろうなとある程度予想はしていましたから。
まずは、自己紹介します。
私、メリッサ・ブレークはフリーランスのライターでブロガーです。自分の人生や体の障がい、そして女性問題について幅広く執筆しています。
私の体について言えば、私の見た目は周りの人を戸惑わせるんじゃないかなと思います。その体のことを38年包み隠さずに綴ってきましたが、その結果、私の書いたものは私の体と同じように長年に渡りたくさんの人たちを戸惑わせてきました。
しかし私はこの世界で生きてきて(それは、私のような障がいのある人たちのためには作られていない世界です。アメリカに住んでいる女性のうち4人に1人は障がいを持っていると言われているんですが)、私たちの社会は障がいについてまだ十分に話せていないと思っています。

それに、障がいについて話す時には、ステレオタイプや誤解が溢れているケースが多すぎるとも思います。わかってもらえるのではないでしょうか。「 障がいのある人は一日中家の中で暮らしていて、外の世界に対して扉を閉ざしているものだ」という時代遅れの考えがまだまだ共有されています。その想像の中では、膝に毛布をかけているかもしれません。
考えるだけで、腹が立つ光景だと思いませんか?
だけど先ほども言ったように、それはありふれたことなんです。
私は8月に、「全員でトランプのTwitterをフォローするのをやめてはどうだろうか」という記事をCNNに寄稿しました。それを見た保守的なユーチューバーが、動画で私のことを話しました。するとその動画のコメント欄は、私の見た目に対する攻撃であふれました。
私の記事についての思慮深い批評や、寄稿の内容に触れたコメントはなし。みんなが、私の見た目を攻撃し馬鹿にしました。
控えめに言って、私はおおいにやる気を刺激されました。あまりにも刺激されたので、この挑戦的なツイートを投稿したのです。

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

コメントにはこう書きました。「私があまりに醜いから自分の写真を投稿するのを禁止すべきだ、とネット上でたくさんの人がコメントしました。それを祝うために、3枚の写真を投稿します」
障がいのある私は、他の人と見た目が違います。もちろん私自身は、そのことを生まれてから今までよく理解しています。
私には、生まれつきフリーマン-シェルドン症候群があります。遺伝的な骨と筋肉の障がいで、この障がいを自分で受け入れるまでに何年もかかりました。
子どものころの最大の敵は鏡。車椅子に座る自分や変形した手を見て、「もしかしたら、私は醜いのかもしれないな」と思うこともありました。
体の傷のほとんどは、服の下に隠れているのですが、隠れていようがいまいが関係ありません。私は、傷の一つ一つを感じることができるのですから(手術を26回したので、体にはたくさんの傷があります)。
時々、実は他の人たちもその傷に気づいているんじゃ、と感じる時もあります。そしてこの傷のことを知ったら、周りの人たちはきっと嫌悪感を覚えるだろうという確信もありました。私自身が10代の頃に、そう感じていましたから。
私たちの社会が定義する美は、とても狭い。広告からInstagramフィードに至るまで、 達成不可能な理想であふれています。
可愛いのがいい。可愛い方が受け入れられる。可愛いのが完璧。
もしそれから、ほんの少しだけでも外れてしまったら?それは、「受け入れらない」になってしまうのです。そして、障がいはその中に含まれています。
例えば、子どもの時に見ていたディズニー映画に出てくるホームレスはどう描かれているでしょうか?その一方でお姫様、例えば「リトル・マーメイド」ではアリエルが美しく描かれ、ウルスラが醜い悪役です。ライオンキングでは、文字通りスカー(傷という意味)という名前のライオンが悪役になっていますよね。

実際、外見が周りと大きく違うということは、醜いの同義語のようになっています。YouTubeの私に対するコメントをリアルタイムで見て、そのことをひしひしと感じました。
私がどれだけ醜く外見が損なわれているか、ということが山ほど書き込まれました。中には、私が自分の見た目を受け入れるのに苦しんでいるとか、社会で受け入れられている“美しさ”とは何か、ということを書いた人もいました。こういったコメントが、私をはねつけ、障がいが私は価値がないというのです。
だけど私のツイートは、本人も驚くほど拡散しました。2週間で30万を超えるいいね!に30万を超えるリツイート!
グッドモーニングアメリカやピープル、BBC、MSN、CBS、シカゴトリビューンなど、メディアからのインタビューが殺到しました。ジョージ・タケイやジャミーラ・ジャミール、Blink182のマーク・ホッパスらセレブもシェアしてくれました。
この一つのツイートで、私は自分の美しさを知りました。人生で初めて、私は自分に価値があると感じられたのです。鏡で自分の見た目を分析していた時代からずっと探し続けていた「自信」。それを280以下の文字で、とうとう手にすることができたのです。
もちろん美人コンテストで優勝したわけではないし、これから先美人コンテストで勝つことはないでしょう。ファッション雑誌の表紙を飾ることもね。だけどそれは、私が醜いということを意味しているわけではありません
そしてツイートは、ネットで私を攻撃してきた人への反撃になっただけでなく(正直、反撃は気持ちいいのですが)、障がいと美しさを一つにするという大きなことを成し遂げました。障がいと美しさが同時に成り立ち、障がいは美しくなりうる。それをツイートは世界に証明しました。
ツイートした後の2週間は、いい意味で非現実的で、慌ただしい日々でした。自分のツイートが、こんなに拡散するなんて思ってもいなかったけれど、結果的に拡散してよかったと思います。
拡散したことで、ずっと待ち望んでいた会話がスタートしたからです。それは、私には障害があり、障がいのある人が自分の美しさを祝ってもいいんだということです。
私を「自撮り写真を投稿するには醜すぎる」と思っている人もまだいるでしょう。それでは、障がいのある人たちはどうやって自分の体を好きになれるのでしょう?さらに言えば、自分が美しいとどうやって感じることができるのでしょうか?
そして、それをできるのは誰でしょうか?
それを、私はできます。私はこれからもずっと続けます(そのために#MyBestSelfie(私の一番の自撮り)というハッシュタグをはじめました)。
これは私の反抗で、世界への生意気なメッセージです。
私の体がパーフェクトになることはないでしょう。だけど私の体はリアル。そして私にとっては、リアルこそが美なのです。
マリッサ・ブレーク:アメリカ・イリノイ州出身のフリーライタ、ブロガー。CNNやワシントンポスト、グッドハウスキーピング、Cosmo、Glomourなどのメディアで、恋愛や障がい、ポップカルチャーについて執筆している。

Copyright 2019 Verizon Media.
原文を読む≫