英文解読練習として英語のニュースから日本語に翻訳された記事をよく読んでいますか?このコーナーではそんな世界の面白いニュースとその日本語訳をピックアップしてご紹介します。リーディングや外国人に話しかける時にも、緊張をほぐして、会話のきっかけとしていかがですか?


英語:“Hiroshima: 70 Years After the Atomic Bomb”

HIROSHIMA, Japan—Every year, Koko Tanimoto Kondo tours her hometown carrying the tiny, tattered pink tunic she wore on the day, 70 years ago, when she and her family survived the world’s first atomic bombing.

On storytelling tours near the Aug. 6 anniversary, Ms. Kondo, who was just 8 months old when the bomb hit, tells students about the devastation that destroyed her childhood home and haunted her for decades.

She shares the humiliation she felt as a teenager, standing naked on a stage while doctors and scientists scrutinized her for signs of radiation’s long-term effects on the body. She recalls when her American fiancé abandoned her days before their wedding because his relatives thought radiation exposure had made her unable to bear children. She offers tales of ordinary Americans who sent food and built homes for the victims, and continued for decades after the war to send checks on birthdays to sons and daughters of Hiroshima connected through “moral adoption.”

Ms. Kondo shows the visitors where her father’s church stood before it collapsed, burying her under the rubble. She takes them to the river that her father crossed in a rowboat to carry victims, some grotesquely burned, to escape the devastation. They go to the Red Cross Hospital, where thousands went for refuge.

Ms. Kondo’s brief appearance in the book “Hiroshima,” by journalist John Hersey, set her on a path to become a messenger from ground zero.

Ms. Kondo’s father, Kiyoshi Tanimoto, was a U.S.-educated minister at a church in Japan. When Mr. Hersey visited Hiroshima in the spring of 1946, Mr. Tanimoto shared with him a detailed account of the horror and chaos he witnessed. In the book, Mr. Tanimoto is described as passing by “rank on rank of the burned and bleeding,” scurrying to find water for dying victims, and removing a dead body from a rowboat to carry those who were still alive, after apologizing to the dead man for doing so.

Ms. Kondo and her mother were buried under the parsonage of her father’s church. Her mother managed to hoist her out of the rubble after chipping away at “a chink of light” that they could eventually fit through. When Rev. Tanimoto was reunited with his wife and baby, he was “so tired that nothing could surprise him.” Mr. Hersey wrote in his account, which first appeared in the New Yorker magazine in August 1946, a year after Hiroshima and Nagasaki became the first and only cities in history to experience a nuclear bombing.

In 1945, the U.S. firebombed major Japanese cities, including Tokyo, and captured Okinawa, but Japan resisted demands for surrender despite its seemingly hopeless position. The U.S. sought to hasten the war’s end with the atomic bombings and avoid an invasion of the main Japanese islands. Japan surrendered six days after the Nagasaki bombing. Historians still debate whether the U.S. could have achieved a similar outcome without using nuclear weapons.

Rev. Tanimoto’s association with Mr. Hersey threw him into the center of the antinuclear movement in postwar America.

On a trip to the U.S. in 1955, Rev. Tanimoto was invited to Los Angeles to appear on an NBC show called “This Is Your Life.”

The show had arranged for several surprise guests, including Ms. Kondo and her family, who were flown in from Japan. Another surprise was an appearance by Capt. Robert Lewis, co-pilot of the Enola Gay, the American bomber that hit Hiroshima.

For a while, the 10-year-old Ms. Kondo stared at Capt. Lewis. She had always dreamed of what it would be like to “kick, bite or punch those bad guys.” Instead, she walked over to the retired airman and touched his hand. Moments earlier, she had seen tears well up in his eyes when the show’s host asked him how he had felt after dropping the bomb. Capt. Lewis told the host, Ms. Kondo recalls, that he wrote in his flight log: “My god, what have we done?”

“That was the moment I changed,” Ms. Kondo said, speaking to a group of young artists from Japan and the U.S. earlier this year. “I said to myself, ‘God, please forgive me for hating this guy. If I hate, I should hate the war.’ ”

Ms. Kondo later married a Japanese man who became a pastor, and they adopted two daughters. Now, she travels frequently to tell her story across Japan and the U.S.

Ms. Kondo’s work, multiplied thousands of times by similar voices, helps explain why pacifism runs deep in Japan. For generations now, in classrooms, in the media and in conversations with older relatives, the Japanese have learned about the devastation of World War II.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe felt the force of that pacifism when he proposed legislation to expand the role of Japan’s military overseas, seeking to counteract new threats to the nation’s security, such as China’s growing territorial ambition. The move required his government to revise its interpretation of the constitution, written by U.S. occupation forces after Japan’s defeat.

Mr. Abe’s decision to push the legislation through parliament’s lower house last month, which sets up final passage by September, drove his once-solid approval rating below 40%.

“Because of our experience in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, more than any other country, must say loudly that war is evil,” says Ms. Kondo. “This country has Article 9 of the constitution that no other country has. It’s a real shame that they are trying to throw it out the window.”

Mr. Abe’s aides say the notion that pacifism has kept Japan from war ignores the protection it receives from the world’s most powerful military—the U.S. The new legislation would ensure Tokyo can help Washington in time of crisis, says Mr. Abe, and he has received support from President Barack Obama.
“Those who have long avoided expressing their political views are beginning to speak up,” says Akihiko Kimijima, professor of constitutional law at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. Ritsumeikan has sponsored the annual student tour of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in partnership with American University in Washington since 1995. Ms. Kondo has accompanied the tour since 1996.

This year, Cannon Hersey, a New York artist and a grandson of John Hersey, met Ms. Kondo in Hiroshima. Mr. Hersey, who had spent months researching the legacy of his grandfather, came with a surprise gift: a nine-page handwritten memo Rev. Tanimoto wrote for the author when he visited Hiroshima in 1946. The memo helps explain how John Hersey managed to gain so many details for his book even though he probably only stayed in the city for about three weeks, the young Mr. Hersey says.

With the ranks of survivors dwindling, Ms. Kondo said she feels a stronger urge than ever to share her story.

“If you stir water in a big washtub with a chopstick, nothing happens first. But if you keep stirring, eventually, you get the water to flow in one direction,” Ms. Kondo said. “That’s why I keep talking to young students. The only thing I can do is to believe in each one of them.”

(c) WSJ

原文を読む≫

日本語:”広島被爆70年、日米学生に悲惨さ語り継ぐ”

【広島】近藤紘子(旧姓:谷本)さんは毎年、ところどころ破れた小さなピンク色の服を持って生まれ故郷を旅する。それは近藤さん一家が70年前、世界初の原爆投下を生き残った日に近藤さんが着ていたものだ。

近藤さんは当時、生後わずか8カ月だった。近藤さんは8月6日の広島原爆の日の時期に行われる語り部ツアーで、自宅を破壊し何十年も近藤さんを悩ませている惨状を学生たちに語っている。

10代の頃、裸でステージの上に立ち、放射線の人体への長期的影響の兆候を確認しようとする医者や科学者からこと細かくじろじろ見られたとき、どれほどの屈辱を感じたか。あるいは、米国人の婚約者の親族が被ばくした近藤さんは子どもが産めないと考えたため、婚約者に結婚式の直前に見捨てられたときの思い。近藤さんは一般の米国人についても語る。彼らは被爆者のために食糧を送り、家を建て、戦後何十年にもわたって「精神養子縁組」でつながった広島の息子、娘たちの誕生日に小切手を送り続けた。

近藤さんは学生たちを父親の教会があった場所にも案内している。原爆投下後、教会は倒壊し、近藤さんはがれきの下敷きになった。また、すさまじい破壊から逃がすため、父親が負傷者―中にはひどいやけどをした人もいた―を手漕(こ)ぎの舟で何度も運んだ川や、数千人が避難を求めた赤十字病院へも学生たちを連れて行く。

米国のジャーナリスト、ジョン・ハーシー氏が原爆投下直後の広島の様子を描いた著作「ヒロシマ」に近藤さんは短く登場している。この本に採り上げられたことで、近藤さんは広島の使者としての道を歩むことになった。

近藤さんの父親、谷本清氏は米国で教育を受け、日本の教会で牧師をしていた。ハーシー氏が1946年春に広島を訪れたとき、谷本氏は原爆投下直後の恐怖と混乱を詳しく語ってくれた。ハーシー氏の「ヒロシマ」には、「やけどをした人、血の流れる人の列また列」の脇を通ったり、死にそうな人たちのために水を探し回ったり、舟の上で死んでいる男性にわびてから遺体を移動させて生存者を運んだりした谷本氏の姿が描かれている。

近藤さんは母親と共に牧師館の下敷きになった。隙間から差し込む「一筋の光」を見つけた母親が30分ほどかけて穴を開け、近藤さんは外に押し出された。ハーシー氏の記述によると、谷本氏は妻子と再会しても、「気分的に疲れきっていたので、もう何事にも驚かない。夫人を抱きよせもせず『ああ、無事だったか』といっただけである」。「ヒロシマ」は1946年8月にニューヨーカー誌に初掲載された。広島と長崎が世界で唯一の被爆都市となった翌年のことだ。

1945年、米国は東京をはじめとする日本の主要都市を爆撃し、沖縄を占領した。しかし、日本は絶望的とみられる戦況にもかかわらず、降伏の要求に抵抗した。米国は原爆投下で戦争を早く終わらせ、日本本土侵略を回避しようと考えた。日本は長崎への原爆投下から6日後、降伏した。米国は核兵器を使用せずとも同じ結果を達成できた可能性があるとの議論は、今も歴史家の間で絶えない。

ハーシー氏と知り合ったことで谷本氏は戦後の米国で反核運動に担ぎ出される。

谷本氏は1955年の訪米時、ロサンゼルスに招かれ、「This Is Your Life(これがあなたの人生だ)」という米NBCのテレビ番組に出演した。

番組は谷本氏の家族を秘密のゲストとして招待。近藤さんは家族とともに父親に内緒で渡米していた。秘密のゲストはもう1人いた。広島に原爆を投下した米軍の爆撃機「エノラ・ゲイ」の副操縦士、ロバート・ルイス大尉だった。

10歳になっていた近藤さんはしばらくルイス大尉を見つめていた。ずっと「悪いやつを蹴っ飛ばしたりかみついたり、たたきたい」と思っていたのに、近藤さんはルイス氏のところに歩いていって、その手に触れた。その直前、近藤さんは、番組の司会者に原爆を投下したあとどんな気持ちだったかと聞かれたルイス氏の目に涙があふれていることに気付いていた。近藤さんの記憶によると、ルイス氏は飛行日誌に「My god, what have we done?(ああ、私たちはなんてことをしてしまったんだ)」と書き込んだと答えた。

「私が変わった瞬間だった」。近藤さんは今年初め、日米の若い芸術家グループにそう語った。「私は自分に言い聞かせた。『神様、この人を憎んだ私を許してください。憎むなら戦争を憎むべきなのです』と」

近藤さんは後に牧師となった日本人男性と結婚し、2人の女の子を養子に迎えた。近藤さんは現在、頻繁に日米の各地を訪れ、自らの体験を語っている。

日本に平和主義が深く根付いているのは近藤さんや同じ意見を持つ人々がメッセージを伝え続けてきたからだ。日本人は何世代にもわたって授業や報道、年上の親類との会話から第2次世界大戦時の日本各地の惨状について学んでいる。

安倍晋三首相は今年、中国の台頭など日本の安全保障に対する新たな脅威への対応を目指し、海外での自衛隊の役割を拡大する法案を議会に提出した。首相はこのとき、平和主義の力を感じた。政府は法案を提出するため、日本の敗戦後に米国の占領軍が起草した憲法の解釈を変更しなければならなかった。

安倍氏が、9月中の成立が可能になる7月16日の衆議院での法案可決を決断すると、内閣支持率は40%を割り込んだ。

近藤さんは「広島と長崎の経験があるのだから、日本こそ世界にはっきりと戦争はいけないと言わなければいけない」と言う。「憲法9条なんて、あんなの日本にしかない。それをなくそうとしているのなんて、私には分からない」

安倍氏の側近は、平和主義のおかげで日本は戦争に巻き込まれなかったという考え方は日本が世界最強の軍力を持つ米国の保護を受けている事実を無視していると指摘する。首相は法案が成立すれば日本は危機の際に米国を支援することができると述べ、米国のオバマ大統領から強力な支持を取り付けた。

立命館大学の憲法学教授、君島東彦氏は安保法案に刺激されて始まった新たな学生運動や抗議集会に触れ、「今まで政治的な発言を控えていた人たちが、声を上げ出している」と話す。立命館大学は1995年から米アメリカン大学と共同で学生の広島・長崎訪問プログラムの主催を続ける。近藤さんは96年からこのプログラムに同行している。

今年、ジョン・ハーシー氏の孫でニューヨーク在住の芸術家、キャノン・ハーシーさんは広島で近藤さんに会った。数カ月をかけて祖父の残したものを調べたキャノンさんはプレゼントを用意していた。それは、1946年に広島を訪れたハーシー氏のために谷本氏が書いた9ページの手書きのメモだった。ハーシー氏が広島に滞在したのは3週間程度だったはずだが、それでも非常に多くの詳細を知ることができたのはこのメモのおかげだとキャノンさんは話す。

被爆者が急速に少なくなるなか、近藤さんは自分の経験を伝えたいという思いがこれまで以上に強くなっていると話す。

「たらいの水を箸でかきまわすと、最初は何も起きないけれど、何回も何回もかき回しているとそのうち渦ができる」と近藤さんは言う。「だから私はこうして学生たちに語りつづけている。ひとりひとりを信じるしかないから」。

(c) WSJ

原文を読む≫