英文解読練習として英語のニュースから日本語に翻訳された記事をよく読んでいますか?このコーナーではそんな世界の面白いニュースとその日本語訳をピックアップしてご紹介します。リーディングや外国人に話しかける時にも、緊張をほぐして、会話のきっかけとしていかがですか?

英語:“Want to Raise Successful Kids? A Former Stanford Dean Says Please Stop Doing This”

If there’s one thing many parents want more than to lead happy, successful lives, it’s to make sure their kids lead happy, successful lives.

Now a former dean of Stanford University freshmen, Julie Lythocott-Haims, says many parents’ hearts may be in the right place—but they’re screwing things up big-time nonetheless.

In her New York Times bestseller How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success, Lythcott-Haims says the problem is a phenomenon we’ve been hearing about since the 1990s—one that’s now crashing hard into American society: helicopter parenting.

She summed up her experience in an interview with the Los Angeles Times:

“Working with the quote-unquote best and brightest, I was seeing more and more [students] who seemed less and less capable of doing the stuff of life. They were incredibly accomplished in the transcript and GPA sense but less with their own selves, evidenced by how frequently they communicated with a parent, texting multiple times a day, needing a parent to tell them what to do.

“I’d been scolding other people for five or six years. One night I started cutting my 10-year-old son’s meat and realized I was enabling dependence on me. I could see the link between parenting and why my college students, though very accomplished academically, were rather existentially impotent.”

“Existentially impotent.”
Ouch! That may be the most original and cutting insult I’ve ever heard.

What’s more, Lythcott-Haims said it applies largely to some of the most privileged kids in our society. Students from less affluent families—who statistically speaking might be more likely to join the military or work while attending community college—seemed to her to be at least as self-sufficient as their predecessors.

But the students she was dealing with as dean of freshmen students, who were attending one of the most elite universities in the world, and who were more likely to graduate and have amazing opportunities, were overwhelmed and unable to function as real adults.

No phone calls?
For example, Lythcott-Haims cited the idea that many Millennials—using her own daughters as examples—seem “paralyzed” by the idea of having to make a simple phone call, because they never had to do so while growing up.

(Her solution with her daughters was to give them tasks that could be resolved only by making phone calls—“because you need to know how to talk to a stranger on a phone and ask a question.”)

So what do we do about this? Her advice for parents, she said in a speech reported by the Chicago Tribune, is to “put ourselves out of a job” by doing a few specific things:

Remember the difference between “I” and “we.”
“If you say ‘we’ when you mean your son or your daughter—as in, ‘We’re on the travel soccer team’—it’s a hint to yourself that you are intertwined in a way that is unhealthy.”

Be your kids’ advocate, not their lawyer.
“If you’re arguing with teachers and principals and coaches and umpires all the time, it’s a sign you’re a little too invested. When we’re doing all the arguing, we are not teaching our kids to advocate for themselves.”

Remember that their work is their work.
Don’t do their homework, she said. “Teach them the skills they’ll need in real life, and give them enough leash to practice those skills on their own. … Chores build a sense of accountability.”

Bottom line, let them try things—and fail.
“We want so badly to help them by shepherding them from milestone to milestone and by shielding them from failure and pain. But overhelping causes harm,” Lythcott-Haimes wrote in How to Raise an Adult. “It can leave young adults without the strengths of skill, will and character that are needed to know themselves and to craft a life.”

Copyright © 2016 TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc.

原文を読む≫

日本語:”子供に成功して欲しければ、これだけはするな スタンフォード大の元学部長が語ったこと”

もし世の中の親が、自分の幸せに代えてでも欲しいと願うものがあるとすれば、それは我が子が幸せで成功に満ちた人生を送ってくれることだろう。

スタンフォード大学で学部長を務めたジュリー・リスコット−ヘイムス氏は、多くの親が子供の幸せを願う一方で、その人生を台無しにしてしまっているケースがあるという。

アメリカでベストセラーとなった著作「How to Raise an Adult(大人の育て方)」の中でヘイムス氏は、1990年頃から顕著になってきたある現象について説明している。俗に「ヘリコプター・ペアレント」と呼ばれる親たちの出現だ。

ヘイムス氏はロサンゼルス・タイムズのインタビューで、彼女のある経験について語った。

いわゆる「超一流で優秀」な子たちと接していると、日常のことがしっかりとできる学生がどんどん減っているのがわかります。作文能力に優れGPA(成績平均点)のスコアは高いのですが、自分のことができないのです。それは学生が親と1日に何度もテキストメッセージをやり取りするなどして連絡を取り合っているところに現れています。何をするべきか、親が教えてくれるまでわからないのです」

「ある晩、10歳の息子に肉を切ってあげているときに、私が子供に依存することを許してしまっているのに気付きました。成績表では優秀な学生たちが、現実世界では役に立たないことと、子供の育て方との関係性がわかったんです」
ヘイムス氏によれば、この傾向は社会的に高い地位で育った子供により多く当てはまるという。あまり裕福でない家庭の子供たち(統計的にはコミュニティカレッジに通いながら兵役につくか就職する傾向がある)は、その親世代と同じく少なくとも自分のことは自分でできるようだ。

反対に、彼女が学部長として関わる、世界のエリート校の1つと言われている大学に通い、卒業すれば驚くほどの機会に恵まれている学生たちが、現実世界では大人としての行動がまるでできないことがあるという。一体なぜ、このようなことが起こるのだろうか?

「電話」ができない?

ヘイムス氏は自身の娘を例に挙げて、多くの10代後半の子供たちが、ちょっと電話をかけなければいけないという状況になると「麻痺」したように固まってしまうことがある指摘した。成長していく過程で、電話をかける必要に迫られたことがなかったせいだろう。

(ちなみにヘイムス氏の解決策は、娘に電話をかけなければ解決できない仕事を与えるというものだった。「電話で見知らぬ人と話し、質問することは生きていく上で必要ですからね」とヘイムス氏)

親にできることとは何なのだろうか? ヘイムス氏はシカゴ・トリビューン上のスピーチで「子供のやることから私たちを排除する」ことの重要性について述べた。そのためには、以下のいくつかの点に気をつけるべきだという。

「I(私)」と「We(私たち)」の違いを理解する

息子や娘について言及するときに「We(私たち)」という主語を使う親たち(例えば「私たちはサッカーチームに入っているのよ」といった具合)は、子供の人生について過干渉になっているサインだ。

子供の弁護士になってはいけない

もしあなたが子供の学校の先生やコーチなどにいつも抗議しているとしたら、子供のことに時間を使いすぎている。親が子供の代わりに抗議していると、子供は自分の主張を自分でできない子になってしまう。

子供のタスクを奪わない

子供の宿題をやってあげているとしたら、今すぐやめよう。親は子供に宿題をやるためのスキルを教えるだけで、子供からそのスキルを使う機会を奪ってはいけない。

また「おつかいや手伝いを頼むことは、子供の責任感を育てるのに有効な手段です」とヘイムス氏は言う。

最後に、子供に沢山挑戦させ、沢山失敗させてあげよう

「私たち親は、どうしても成長の途中で子供を保護して、失敗や苦痛から守ってあげたいと思ってしまいます。でも過剰な手助けは子供にとって有害です」

「自分自身が何者であるかを知り、人生を作りあげていくためのスキル、意思、性格というものを持たない若者になってしまいます」

Copyright ©2016 The Huffington Post Japan, Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

原文を読む≫